Smell and Taste changes provide early indication of COVID-19 community spread

Smell and Taste changes provide early indication of COVID-19 community spread

Smell and Taste changes are basic indication of COVID-19

Source:           Penn State

Summary:       Self-reports of smell and taste changes provide earlier markers of the spread of infection of SARS-CoV-2 than current governmental indicators, according to an international team of researchers. The researchers also observed a decline in self-reports of smell and taste changes as early as five days after lock down enforcement, with faster declines reported in countries that adopted the most stringent lock down measures.

Also Read:  https://saadtraders.pk/dust-mask/

Full Story:

Self-reports of smell and taste changes provide earlier markers of the spread of infection of SARS-CoV-2 than current governmental indicators, according to an international team of researchers. The researchers also observed a decline in self-reports of smell and taste changes as early as five days after lock down enforcement, with faster declines reported in countries that adopted the most stringent lock down measures.

“In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, many governments have taken drastic measures to prevent their intensive care units from becoming overwhelmed with patients,” said John Hayes, professor of food science, Penn State. “Our research suggests that an increase in the incidence of sudden smell and taste change in the general population may indicate that COVID-19 is spreading. This knowledge could help decision-makers take important measures at the local level, either in catching new outbreaks sooner, or in guiding the relaxation of local lockdowns, given the strong impact of lockdown on economic and social activities.”

In their study, which published on Oct. 14 in Nature Communications, the researchers used data from the Global Consortium for Chemosensory Research survey, a global, crowd-sourced online study deployed in more than 35 languages. Specifically, the team examined data that were collected from April 7 to May 14, 2020, although study recruitment is still ongoing.

Also Read; https://saadtraders.pk/coronavirus-disease-covid-19-what-parents-should-know/

In addition, the team looked at data from the French government — which beginning on May 7, 2020, has been categorizing various geographical areas of the country as red or green, depending on their COVID-19 prevalence. Compared to green areas, red areas were characterized by higher active circulation of the virus, higher levels of pressure on hospitals and reduced capacity to test new cases.

Finally, to determine whether self-reported smell and taste loss could serve as an early indicator of the number of COVID-19 cases, and therefore hospital stress, the team compared data from France with data from Italy and the United Kingdom, each of which implemented lockdown measures at different times and with different levels of stringency.

“Our primary aim was to test the association between self-reported smell and taste changes and indicators of pressure in hospitals, such as COVID-related hospitalizations, critical care resuscitation unit admissions and mortality rates, for each French administrative region over the last three months,” said Veronica Pereda-Loth, lead researcher at the Université Paul Sabatier Toulouse III in France. “Our secondary aim was to examine temporal relationships between the peak of smell and taste changes in the population and the peak of COVID-19 cases and the application of lockdown measures.”

Overall, the team found that smell and taste changes were better correlated with the number of COVID-19 admissions to hospitals than France’s current governmental indicators, which look at the ratio of ER consultations for suspicion of COVID-19 to general ER consultations. Specifically, the researchers found that the peak onset of changes in smell/taste appeared four days after lockdown measures were implemented. In contrast, the governmental indicator based on ER consultations peaked 11 days after the lockdown.

“Our findings are consistent with emerging data showing that COVID-19-related changes in smell and taste occur in the first few days after infection,” said Hayes. “They suggest that self-reports of smell and taste changes are closely associated with hospital overload and are early markers of the spread of infection of SARS-CoV-2. Therefore, potential outbreaks and the short-term efficacy of a lockdown could be monitored by tracking changes in smell and taste in the population.”

Data collection for multiple GCCR studies are still ongoing. You can participate by going to https://gcchemosensr.org.

Other authors on the paper include Denis Pierron, Veronica Pereda-Loth, Omar Alva, Julie Kabous, Margit Heiske and Thierry Letellier at Universite Paul-Sabiater Toulouse III; Marylou Mantel, Maelle Moranges, Camille Ferdenzi and Moustafa Bensafi at Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1; Emmanuelle Bignon, Jody Pacalon, Jerome Golebiowski and Renaud David at Universite Cote d’Azur; Caterina Dinnella, Sara Spinelli and Erminio Monteleone at University of Florence; Michael C. Farruggia at Yale University; Keiland W. Cooper at University of California, Irvine; Elizabeth A. Sell at University of Pennsylvania; Thierry Thomas-Danguin at University Bourgogne Franche-Comte; Alyssa J. Bakke at Penn State; and Valentina Parma at Temple University.

This work was supported financially by EXTREM-O (CNRS MITI), CONFINEZ2 (CNES), the CORODORAT grant (IDEX-Lyon-Universite de Lyon), by the French government, through the UCAJEDI “Investments in the Future” project managed by the ANR grant No. ANR-15-IDEX-01. Deployment of the Global Consortium for Chemosensory Research survey in multiple languages was partially supported by funds from James and Helen Zallie and the Penn State Sensory Evaluation Center.

 Story Source:

Materials provided by Penn State. Original written by Sara LaJeunesse. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

Journal Reference:

Denis Pierron, Veronica Pereda-Loth, Marylou Mantel, Maëlle Moranges, Emmanuelle Bignon, Omar Alva, Julie Kabous, Margit Heiske, Jody Pacalon, Renaud David, Caterina Dinnella, Sara Spinelli, Erminio Monteleone, Michael C. Farruggia, Keiland W. Cooper, Elizabeth A. Sell, Thierry Thomas-Danguin, Alyssa J. Bakke, Valentina Parma, John E. Hayes, Thierry Letellier, Camille Ferdenzi, Jérôme Golebiowski, Moustafa Bensafi. Smell and taste changes are early indicators of the COVID-19 pandemic and political decision effectivenessNature Communications, 2020; 11 (1) DOI: 10.1038/s41467-020-18963-y

 Cite This Page:

Penn State. “Smell and taste changes provide early indication of COVID-19 community spread.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 November 2020. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/11/201111153107.htm>.

Also Read: 

          https://saadtraders.pk/how-the-virus-has-affected-you/

Normal life-Covid-19

Our prioritization in new normal (Covid-19)

We are still facing an unpredictable condition as more Covid-19 cases Worldwide, which is why it’s important to do a vigilant check of your policies and procedures to keep clients, patients and employee safe and sound.

This can take many forms: In the workplace, it means reducing exposure, such as limiting staff in the lunchroom or demanding face masks. It means limiting non-essential meetings and leveraging video conferencing with your team whenever possible. It means shared physical space between employees and patients, including avoiding greetings that involve touching or hugging.

Of course, with all new things come encounters, and we are seeing new information daily. In this continuation, I am sharing and updated latest practices for leaders, whether their teams are still working from home or preparing to return at site environment.

Also read: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19): What parents should know

Maximize remote team’s productivity.

What if a certain employee is still having trouble adjusting to remote work, and as a result, productivity levels drop? By offering productivity tools and tricks, this challenge can be alleviated. Let’s consider some choices:

  1. Provide resources for a proper work-from-home setup. 

Educate staff on an appropriate workstation setup and remote work prerequisites.

  1. Define planning and goal setting for remote employees. 

Communicate with team members that SMART planning and goal setting is compulsory. Lead video meetings to delegate tasks to the appropriate team members and follow up on progress via video conferencing. This strategy sets a real tone for employee accountability, engagement and discipline.

  1. Host virtual happy hours to keep team members connected. 

Many employees experience anxiety and isolation when working from home. Solution? Spend time with your team catching up, and not necessarily about work. Virtual happy hours are a great tactic to overcome negative feelings of social distancing and instead, create a positive feeling of relevancy. Person-to-person interactions are the building blocks of culture, even virtually.

  1. Demonstrate empathy for employees balancing child care during the workday. 

Many day care services have closed their doors; even if some are reopening, parents may not be fully comfortable releasing their children back into the public child care system yet. Solution? Have a conversation with your team about staggering shifts, or set a schedule that allows employees to balance work and child care with their partners’ schedules.

  1. Carefully consider when it is safe for your team to return to the office.

When an infectious disease no longer exhausts the medical center’s capability to handle it, the threat would be considered lower risk. As a CEO, business owner and leader, it is your special duty to do your due diligence before opening your corporate doors. 

Here are some factors to consider:

  • Where are you located? This is the most vital element to consider. Monitor Covid-19 cases and stats within your vicinity to reach a decision. In British Columbia, where I’m located, the rate of Covid-19 cases is relatively low compared to the rest of Canada. In Florida, at time of writing, cases are increasing daily. Keep up withlive Coronavirus updatesbefore you consider full operation, and always pay attention to the most up-to-date information from reliable public health sources.
  • How big is your office space, and how many employees do you have? These two factors are correlated. Do you have enough space in your office to create a structured layout and spread out your staff to meet health and safety regulations? If you lack sufficient space to create a structured layout arrangement, continue to encourage the remote work setup.
  • Is your staff ready to return to work?Are they anxious? Eager? Not ready to be in a public setting yet? Manage and remind your employees of the resources available to them through your organization, including communication, tools and services such as EAP (employee assistance program). To avoid high levels of stress, disseminate the new plan of action (new office layout and safety rules), and communicate that it is in place to protect them.
  • Also read:  Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) advice for the public

Remember that taking care of yourself is equally as important. The care you exude for your employees shows in your behavior, and leading by example is the most effective self-care you can model.

The world is changing, and the pandemic has accelerated this shift. While Covid-19 is undoubtedly going to change daily operations, now is the time to think more seriously about alternative sources of revenue to adapt and plan for the future.

Pl read this article: WHO Basic protective measures against the new coronavirus

Young Entrepreneur Council (YEC) is an invitation-only, fee-based organization comprised of the world’s most successful entrepreneurs 45 and younger. YEC members…    

Pl read Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health

 

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) advice for the public

Stay aware of the latest information on the COVID-19 outbreak, available on the WHO website and through your national and local public health authority. Most countries around the world have seen cases of COVID-19 and many are experiencing outbreaks. Authorities in China and some other countries have succeeded in slowing their outbreaks. However, the situation is unpredictable so check regularly for the latest news.

Related article: https://www.dawn.com/live-blog/

Protecting yourself and others from the spread COVID-19

You can reduce your chances of being infected or spreading COVID-19 by taking some simple precautions:

  • Regularly and thoroughly clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand rub or wash them with soap and water. Why? Washing your hands with soap and water or using alcohol-based hand rub kills viruses that may be on your hands.
  • Maintain at least 1 metre (3 feet) distance between yourself and others. Why? When someone coughs, sneezes, or speaks they spray small liquid droplets from their nose or mouth which may contain virus. If you are too close, you can breathe in the droplets, including the COVID-19 virus if the person has the disease.
  • Avoid going to crowded places. Why? Where people come together in crowds, you are more likely to come into close contact with someone that has COIVD-19 and it is more difficult to maintain physical distance of 1 metre (3 feet).
  • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth. Why? Hands touch many surfaces and can pick up viruses. Once contaminated, hands can transfer the virus to your eyes, nose or mouth. From there, the virus can enter your body and infect you.
  • Make sure you, and the people around you, follow good respiratory hygiene. This means covering your mouth and nose with your bent elbow or tissue when you cough or sneeze. Then dispose of the used tissue immediately and wash your hands. Why? Droplets spread virus. By following good respiratory hygiene, you protect the people around you from viruses such as cold, flu and COVID-19.
  • Stay home and self-isolate even with minor symptoms such as cough, headache, mild fever, until you recover. Have someone bring you supplies. If you need to leave your house, wear a mask to avoid infecting others. Why? Avoiding contact with others will protect them from possible COVID-19 and other viruses.
  • If you have a fever, cough and difficulty breathing, seek medical attention, but call by telephone in advance if possible and follow the directions of your local health authority. Why? National and local authorities will have the most up to date information on the situation in your area. Calling in advance will allow your health care provider to quickly direct you to the right health facility. This will also protect you and help prevent spread of viruses and other infections.
  • Keep up to date on the latest information from trusted sources, such as WHO or your local and national health authorities. Why? Local and national authorities are best placed to advise on what people in your area should be doing to protect themselves.

         Related article: https://www.dawn.com/news/1554931/covid-19-cases-among-workers-returning-           from-uae-alarm-govt

        Advice on the safe use of alcohol-based hand sanitizers;

        To protect yourself and others against COVID-19, clean your hands frequently and thoroughly.              Use alcohol-based hand sanitizer or wash your hands with soap and water. If you use an                        alcohol-  based hand sanitizer, make sure you use and store it carefully.

    • Keep alcohol-based hand sanitizers out of children’s reach. Teach them how to apply the sanitizer and monitor its use.
    • Apply a coin-sized amount on your hands. There is no need to use a large amount of the product.
    • Avoid touching your eyes, mouth and nose immediately after using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer, as it can cause irritation.
    • Hand sanitizers recommended to protect against COVID-19 are alcohol-based and therefore can be flammable. Do not use before handling fire or cooking.
    • Under no circumstance, drink or let children swallow an alcohol-based hand sanitizer. It can be poisonous. 
    • Remember that washing your hands with soap and water is also effective against COVID-19.
  • Article published for awareness and first published: @https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/advice-for-public

Covid-19 Trajectory in Pakistan in one Month

Pakistan reported its first coronavirus case on February 26. A month later, the national tally has crossed 1,000 and there have been eight deaths as provinces scramble to contain the spread of the pandemic, which first emerged in the Chinese city of Wuhan last year in December.

Cases in Pakistan

Initially, the cases reported in the country rose by single digit numbers. However, from March 15, the numbers started rising significantly as pilgrims from the Pakistan-Iran border at Taftan began arriving back into the country.

Over the past 10 days — from March 15 to March 25 — Pakistan’s Covid-19 cases have jumped from 53 to 1,078.

The steepest rise in the number of cases was reported on March 19, as cases rose from 302 a day prior to 457.

Many have criticised the federal government for failing to take decisive action when pilgrims from Iran began filtering back, believing that their ineffectiveness in tackling the situation caused the number of cases in the country to skyrocket.

Read: Squalid Taftan quarantine camps present a sorry state of affairs

According to Leader of the Opposition in the National Assembly Shehbaz Sharif, Pakistan’s Covid-19 outbreak would never have progressed to this degree had the federal government ensured proper protocols and arrangements at the quarantine facility at Taftan.

Prime Minister Imran Khan has, meanwhile, has urged citizens to not panic, and advised them to self-isolate and avoid public gatherings.

Read: PM Imran hopeful Pakistan’s ‘hot and dry’ weather will mitigate virus threat

“If we exercise discipline for the next month-and-a-half, and avoid going to public places, and if those showing symptoms self-quarantine, then the spread of the virus can be be controlled,” the premier had said while speaking to senior journalists in Islamabad.

What’s our provincial situation like?

By March 25, Sindh accounted for majority of Pakistan’s cases, reporting 413 cases. The drastic jump seen in Pakistan’s number between March 15 and March 16, was caused by Sindh, as the provincial numbers jumped from 25 to 150.

Another steep increase was witnessed on March 23 as cases rose from 333 a day earlier to 394.

Punjab, despite being the largest province, only accounted for 323 cases reported in Pakistan by March 25, possibly because it started testing later than other provinces.

Cases in the province started to rise by a significant amount from March 18, rising from 33 a day earlier to 83. The sharpest spike was witnessed on March 22 as cases rose from 152 to 225.

Khyber Pakhtunkwa, which had only 38 cases on March 23, had reported 121 cases on March 25.

So far the least number of cases have emerged from Islamabad Capital Territory (ICT), having reported only 20 cases by March 25.

Lockdown or curfew?

Prime Minister Imran has repeatedly voiced his hesitation against declaring a national lockdown, stating that the economic implications of such a move would devastate the country and weigh heavy on the lives of labourers and daily-wage workers.

However, provinces — among them Sindh the first one to take charge — have taken their own steps to curb the spread of the virus.

Sindh — which has been lauded for its decisive measures — has imposed a complete lockdown, directing all shops, including grocery stores, to remain closed from 8pm to 8am.

Following suit, the Punjab government enforced a “partial lockdown” ordering all public and private offices to remain closed and suspending transport; Balochistan has also enforced the same and has sealed all malls, shops and business as well as banning public transport.

In addition, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa has closed all government offices and banned inter-city transport while Azad Jammu and Kashmir has sealed all entry points and ordered all stores, apart from grocery shops and pharmacies, to remain shut.

Covid-19 numbers across the globe

Coronavirus

WHO Basic protective measures against the new coronavirus

Stay aware of the latest information on the COVID-19 outbreak, available on the WHO website and through your national and local public health authority. Most people who become infected experience mild illness and recover, but it can be more severe for others. Take care of your health and protect others by doing the following:

Wash your hands frequently

Regularly and thoroughly clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand rub or wash them with soap and water.

Why? Washing your hands with soap and water or using alcohol-based hand rub kills viruses that may be on your hands.

Maintain social distancing

Maintain at least 1 metre (3 feet) distance between yourself and anyone who is coughing or sneezing.

Why? When someone coughs or sneezes they spray small liquid droplets from their nose or mouth which may contain virus. If you are too close, you can breathe in the droplets, including the COVID-19 virus if the person coughing has the disease.

Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth

Why? Hands touch many surfaces and can pick up viruses. Once contaminated, hands can transfer the virus to your eyes, nose or mouth. From there, the virus can enter your body and can make you sick.

Practice respiratory hygiene

Make sure you, and the people around you, follow good respiratory hygiene. This means covering your mouth and nose with your bent elbow or tissue when you cough or sneeze. Then dispose of the used tissue immediately.

Why? Droplets spread virus. By following good respiratory hygiene you protect the people around you from viruses such as cold, flu and COVID-19.

If you have fever, cough and difficulty breathing, seek medical care early

Stay home if you feel unwell. If you have a fever, cough and difficulty breathing, seek medical attention and call in advance. Follow the directions of your local health authority.

Why? National and local authorities will have the most up to date information on the situation in your area. Calling in advance will allow your health care provider to quickly direct you to the right health facility. This will also protect you and help prevent spread of viruses and other infections.

Stay informed and follow advice given by your healthcare provider

Stay informed on the latest developments about COVID-19. Follow advice given by your healthcare provider, your national and local public health authority or your employer on how to protect yourself and others from COVID-19.

Why? National and local authorities will have the most up to date information on whether COVID-19 is spreading in your area. They are best placed to advise on what people in your area should be doing to protect themselves.

Protection measures for persons who are in or have recently visited (past 14 days) areas where COVID-19 is spreading

  • Follow the guidance outlined above.
  • Stay at home if you begin to feel unwell, even with mild symptoms such as headache and slight runny nose, until you recover. Why? Avoiding contact with others and visits to medical facilities will allow these facilities to operate more effectively and help protect you and others from possible COVID-19 and other viruses.
  • If you develop fever, cough and difficulty breathing, seek medical advice promptly as this may be due to a respiratory infection or other serious condition. Call in advance and tell your provider of any recent travel or contact with travelers. Why? Calling in advance will allow your health care provider to quickly direct you to the right health facility. This will also help to prevent possible spread of COVID-19 and other viruses.
Falling at height

Fall height death statistics

Make Fall Safety a Top Priority

It may come as a surprise that the third leading cause of unintentional injury-related death is falls. In 2015, nearly 33,381 people died in falls at home and at work – and for working adults, depending on the industry, falls can be the leading cause of death.

Hazards in the Workplace

In 2014, 660 workers died in falls from a higher level, and 49,210 were injured badly enough to require days off of work. A worker doesn’t have fall from a high level to suffer fatal injuries. While half of all fatal falls in 2014 occurred from 20 feet or lower, 12% were from less than 6 feet, according to Injury Facts 2017®

Construction workers are most at risk for fatal falls from height – more than seven times the rate of other industries – but falls can happen anywhere, even at a “desk job.”

NSC data for 2014 includes falls from height and falls on the same level, by industry:

  1. Construction: 22,330 injuries, 359 deaths
  2. Manufacturing: 23,290 injuries, 49 deaths
  3. Wholesale trade: 14,360 injuries, 30 deaths
  4. Retail trade: 29,530 injuries, 34 deaths
  5. Transportation and Warehousing: 23,780 injuries, 43 deaths
  6. Professional and business services: 23,140 injuries, 94 deaths
  7. Education and health services: 51,150 injuries, 21 deaths
  8. Government: 69,530 injuries, 41 deaths     

Also read:   Risk Management Need Every One

Falls are 100% Preventable

Whether working from a ladder, roof or scaffolding, it’s important to plan ahead, assess the risk and use the right        equipment. First, determine if working from a height is absolutely necessary or if there is another way to do the task safely.

  1. Discuss the task with coworkers and determine what safety equipment is needed
  2. Make sure you are properly trained on how to use the equipment
  3. Scan the work area for potential hazards before starting the job
  4. Make sure you have level ground to set up the equipment
  5. If working outside, check the weather forecast; never work in inclement weather
  6. Use the correct tool for the job, and use it as intended
  7. Ensure stepladders have a locking device to hold the front and back open
  8. Always keep two hands and one foot, or two feet and one hand on the ladder
  9. Place the ladder on a solid surface and never lean it against an unstable surface
  10. A straight or extension ladder should be 1 foot away from the surface it rests on for every 4 feet of height and extend at least 3 feet over the top edge
  11. Securely fasten straight and extension ladders to an upper support
  12. Wear slip-resistant shoes and don’t stand higher than the third rung from the top
  13. Don’t lean or reach while on a ladder, and have someone support the bottom
  14. Never use old or damaged equipment; check thoroughly before use

Also read: Stop Work Authority Program

Millions of people are treated in emergency rooms for fall-related injuries every year.

A fall can end in death or disability in a split second,

but with a few simple precautions, you’ll be sure stay safe at at work

First it is published @https://www.nsc.org/work-safety/safety-topics/slips-trips-and-falls